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What Is a Group of Cats Called? - Slideshow


A group of cats have a different name.

There's a type of word in the English language called a "collective noun." It is a word used for a group of individuals. What is a group of cats called? It's called a clowder! A clowder of cats.


Collective nouns for animals can sound strange.

A group of cats can also be called a clutter, a glaring, or a pounce.


Lions gather in prides.

It seems as though most groups of cats would prefer to go by something that sounds more regal, like pride. However, pride is reserved for lions, and they are probably prepared to defend their turf . . . er, term.


When apes band together they are called a shrewdness of apes.

A clowder of cats may sound strange, but it's not the oddest of the collective nouns:

There's also a shrewdness of apes. These guys do look like they're being shrewd.


A leap of leopards is the term used for a group of leopards.

A leap of leopards sounds like something from a Christmas carol, but it's a real term.


A crash of rhinoceroses is an appropriate term.

A crash of rhinoceroses actually makes a lot of sense.


A paddling of ducks seems like the perfect collective noun.

A paddling of ducks seems too cute to be true.


Poor ravens are called an unkindness when grouped.

An unkindness of ravens? These birds sure do get a bad rap.


A business of ferrets should be able to get a lot accomplished.

A business of ferrets! Business is the last thing a group of ferrets ever seems to care about.


A group of kittens doesn't need a tablet to be called a kindle.

Just to avoid confusion, clowder is not the word for a group of kittens. Nope, it's a kindle of kittens.


The collective noun for puppies is, appropriately, a piddle.

But it isn't an iPad of puppies. It's something that really makes a lot more sense, and anyone who's ever cared for a group of puppies probably could have guessed it. It's a piddle of puppies.

Sometimes English is fun!


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References:

Lipton, J. (1968). An Exaltation of Larks. New York: Grossman Publishers, Inc.

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