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Why Do Cats Do the Slow Eye Blink? : It's a Kitty "Eye Love You"!

A cat that blinks very slowly at you is communicating love.

If you've lived with cats, there has probably been a time when you've wondered, "Why is my cat winking at me?" Your sweet feline might be sitting on your lap, or maybe she's perched in her bed on the other side of the room, but she's looking at you with her eyes partly shut. When you look her way, she ever so slowly closes them all the way, then opens them back up to the halfway position to gaze at you once again. Some cats will perform a variation of this, starting with their eyes open, then closing them halfway while making eye contact with you. On occasion, a cat will even perform one of these actions with only one eye, winking in a charming manner.

What Does a Cat's Slow Eye Blink Mean?

All types of cats use the slow eye blink to convey relaxation and love.

Many cat owners assume that their feline friend is just sleepy when this slow blink occurs, and sometimes that may be true. But most cat behavior experts agree that this gesture is actually part of your cat's communication arsenal. It means that she is relaxed, happy, and content, and she wants to convey that information to you. It's like a kitty kiss!

Cats that are in groups seem to use the slow blink to let their buddies know that everything is calm and cool . . . no need for any fighting here. Even big cats use this behavior to communicate relaxation and love.

Now that you know what your cat is trying to tell you with her adorable winks, you can try to respond to her in the same way, with your own "Eye Love You" kitty kisses.

If your cat is continuously holding one eye in a squinting position, even when she is not in a relaxed state, if there is abnormal drainage from one or both eyes, or if she is rubbing at her eyes, take her to the veterinarian right away. She may have an eye injury or infection.

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